IFS Webinars Sep 14-17

IFS WebinarsYou’re invited to the following free IFS Webinar Events 

Introduction to Advanced IFS Classes Webinars

Each webinar is an introduction to the Advanced IFS Classes, where you can find out more about how the classes operate and what topics we will be covering.  Read more about the Advanced IFS classes.

Monday, 9/14/15, 4:30 pm pacific  (7:30 pm eastern)
Tuesday, 9/15/15, 10 am pacific (1 pm eastern)  

Click here to enroll for free

 


 

Introduction to IFS Webinars

Each webinar is an introduction to Internal Family Systems Therapy (IFS), where you will learn how to understand your psyche in terms of parts, heal your wounded inner child parts, and transform your behavior. Read more about the IFS webinar.

Tuesday, 9/15/15, 4:30 pm pacific  (7:30 pm eastern)
Thursday, 9/17/15, 4:00 pm pacific (7:00 pm eastern)

Click here to enroll for free

Feel free to register even if you can’t make the webinars. A replay will be available afterwards.

 

Webinars: Introduction to IFS


Needy WoundIFS is a powerful form of individual therapy developed by Richard Schwartz, PhD, which has been spreading rapidly around the U.S. and the world.

It is user-friendly, spiritually-oriented, and very effective in working with trauma as well as a wide variety of other psychological issues.

Each webinar is an introduction to Internal Family Systems Therapy (IFS), where you will learn how to understand your psyche in terms of parts, heal your wounded inner child parts, and transform your behavior.

You can also learn about the Basic IFS Course coming up this fall.

Tuesday, 9/8/15, 4:30 pm
Click here to enroll for free
Tuesday, 9/15/15, 4:30 pm
Thursday, 9/17/15, 4:30 pm

The IFS Approach to Therapeutic Change

Here’s an understanding of the IFS approach to therapeutic changeThe protector and the exile.

Once you have gotten to know a protector (a part that defends against underlying pain) and developed a trusting relationship with it, you have made important progress toward helping it to relax and let go of its protective role. Until then, the protector will be worried that the exile (a wounded inner child part) will be harmed or that you will feel the exile’s pain.

Think of it this way. If you felt protective of a younger sister who was in danger from bullies at school, you wouldn’t be able to relax your guard until you were certain the bullies were neutralized and your sister could take care of herself.

It is the same with a protector. It may relax some, but usually it can’t fully let go until the exile it protects is healed. It might actually be destructive to try and push past the protector or to convince it to drop its role entirely. This could set up an adversarial relationship with the protector in which it feels that it must resist you instead of cooperating with you.

Therefore, at first we don’t spend much time trying to induce the protector to change. We simply ask its permission to work with the exile it is protecting and then move on to healing that child part.

Once this has been accomplished, we come back and check with the protector. At that point, it is more likely to release its protective role because the exile is no longer in pain and needing protection.

Thus there is a trajectory to the IFS process; we move from protector to exile and back again.

This is in contrast to many therapies that just try to get past protectors to heal exiles. They don’t connect with and respect protectors, so the protector’s transformation is often incomplete.

And protectors are the parts that run our lives.